Uranium in drinking water, no problem for the FEWATEC Cristal Filter

30.08.2020

Occurrence
Uranium is a natural element found in soil. The uranium concentration varies depending on the soil composition. In Switzerland, increased uranium concentrations in the soil are found in the Alpine regions. [1]. In Germany in the south and east (Saxony, Thuringia) [2].
Information can be obtained from your drinking water supplier.
Water-soluble uranium compounds can thus enter drinking water via groundwater and spring catchments.

 

Legislation
In small masses, uranium is not dangerous for the human body. However, the increased, permanent absorption of uranium can lead to undesirable reactions in the body and can be harmful.

In Switzerland, the highest permissible value for uranium is laid down in legislation.
817.022.11, Ordinance of the FDHA on Drinking Water and Water in Public Bathrooms and Showers of 16 December 2016 (status on 1 July 2020).
Maximum uranium content in drinking water: 30 ug/l.
In Germany, the first amendment to the Drinking Water Ordinance, which came into force on 1 November 2011, introduced a limit value of 10 ug/l for uranium in drinking water.

Removal of uranium from drinking water
The most common method in practice for removing uranium from drinking water is the use of ion exchangers. [3]. Countless studies on this subject confirm this. [4].
The FEWATEC CRISTAL filter has an ion exchange stage. The ion exchanger used here is predestined for the removal of metal ions, which also include the water-soluble uranium compounds.
Smallest, insoluble particles are removed by the membrane filter used.

1] Swiss Confederation, Food safety, Bulletin 12, Occurrence of uranium in Swiss drinking water, 19 March 2010
2] Federal Environment Agency Uranium in Soil and Water, Claudia Dienemann, Jens Utermann, Dessau-Roslau, 2012
3] Swiss Gas and Water Industry Association SVGW, Handling of the geogenic trace substances arsenic and uranium in drinking water supply, W1015 d, May 2015 edition
4] Federal Ministry of Education and Research, DVGW, joint project. Uranium removal in drinking water treatment, December 2009

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